School Statutory Website Requirements 2022 – What’s Changed?

Unsurprisingly, the statutory school website requirements have been updated following a couple of disrupted years in education.   The document can be found here but I have summarised the main changes below – I have also included templates that we use when we audit websites that you might find useful to download and use yourself. 

Table of Contents

School Uniform

Following a lot of publicity about the cost of school uniform, especially relevant during a cost of living crisis, a new section has been added on School Uniform. 

Previous Requirements:

None

New Requirements:

The published uniform policy should be easy to understand and, where a school has a school uniform, should:

  • clearly state whether an item is optional or required
  • make clear if the item will only be worn at certain times of the year (for example, if it’s summer or winter uniform)
  • make clear whether a generic item will be accepted or if a branded item is required
  • make clear whether an item can only be purchased from a specific retailer or if it can be purchased more widely, including from second-hand retailers

Test, exam and assessment results

As expected, there have been lots of changes to this section.  Key Stage 2 still has to keep the 2018 – 2019 data available to parents but they have reduced what they explicitly say you should have available.  Key Stage 4 and 5 have to publish data from the 2021 – 2022 year – there has been a slight change to the requirements at KS5 with progress being removed. 

 

Previous Requirements:

Key stage 2 (end of primary school) results

You must publish the following details from your school’s most recent key stage 2 performance measures as published by the Secretary of State (for most schools, the performance measures published for the 2018 to 2019 academic year):

  • progress scores in reading, writing and maths
  • percentage of pupils who achieved at least the expected standard in reading, writing and maths
  • percentage of pupils who achieved at a higher standard in reading, writing and maths
  • average ‘scaled scores’ in reading and maths

New Requirements:

Key stage 2 (end of primary school) results

You do not need to publish your key stage 2 results for the academic year 2021 to 2022 on your website, as the Secretary of State will not publish this data. This is because statutory assessments returned for the first time since 2019, without adaptations, after disruption caused by the pandemic.

You should continue to display your school’s most recent key stage 2 performance measures, as published by the Secretary of State, on your website. For most schools, these will be the performance measures published for the 2018 to 2019 academic year.

You should clearly mark that these performance measures are for the 2018 to 2019 academic year and are not current. For example, you could add the following sentence to your results:

“The government will not publish KS2 school level data for the 2021 to 2022 academic year. They have archived data from the 2018 to 2019 academic year because they recognise that the data from that year may no longer reflect current performance.”

Previous Requirements:

Key stage 5 (16 to 18) information

If your school operates a sixth form, you must publish the following details from your school’s 16 to 18 performance tables page most recent key stage 5 (16 to 18) performance measures 16 to 18 accountability headline measures guidance as published by the Secretary of State (for most schools, the performance measures published for the 2018 to 2019 academic year):

  • progress
  • attainment
  • English and mathematics progress
  • retention
  • destinations

New Requirements:

Key stage 5 (16 to 18) information

If your school operates a sixth form, you must publish the most recent 16 to 18 performance measures, as published by the Secretary of State. For most schools, once published, these will be the performance measures for the 2021 to 2022 academic year:

  • attainment
  • retention
  • destinations

Progress performance measures

If your school operates a sixth form, you do not need to display progress measures (level 3 value added), or an English and mathematics progress measure, for 16 to 18 students on your website. These measures will not be published for the 2021 to 2022 academic year.

Opening hours

Since Nadhim Zahawi announced that he wanted all schools to be open for a minimum of 32.5 hours per week, it will come as no surprise that they have added a new section to reflect this.  The one thing to note is that you should have your opening hours listed and your statutory hours.  I guess this shows parents the difference between when you open the doors and when registration officially starts.

 

Previous Requirements:

None

New Requirements:

Schools should publish on their website their opening and closing times and the total time this amounts to in a typical week (for example 32.5 hours).

Schools should show the compulsory times they are open. This time runs from the official start of the school day (morning registration) to the official end of the compulsory school day. It includes breaks, but not optional before or after school activities.

Curriculum

This seems to be a change for clarity.  Having audited many websites, I have to say, this was one of the most tricky bits of information to find.  Some schools would include it in their Intent Statement, some in their Accessibility Plan, some in their SEN etc.  Now it’s clear – this should be in your Accessibility Plan. 

Previous Requirements:

Your approach to the curriculum should also include how you are complying with your duties in the Equality Act 2010 and the Special Educational Needs and Disability Regulations 2014 about making the curriculum accessible for those with disabilities or special educational needs.

New Requirements:

You must also set out how over time you will increase the extent to which disabled pupils participate in the school’s curriculum, as part of your school’s accessibility plan. 

Remote education

With us now “living with COVID” this has changed from a must publish to a should publish. 

Previous Requirements:

You must publish information about your school’s remote education provision on your website. An optional template is available to support schools with this requirement.

New Requirements:

You should consider publishing information about your school’s remote education provision on your website. An optional template is available to support schools with this. 

Pupil Premium

With the new DfE template it would seem they have removed some of the publishing criteria – I don’t think it’s because the information is no longer important, I think it is because it is now automatically included in all reports because everyone uses the same template.  One interesting point though is that they have removed the explicit requirement for details from last years spend – this is probably the result of the shift towards encouraging schools to have a 3 year strategy. 

Previous Requirements:

You must publish a strategy for the school’s use of the pupil premium. DfE has published templates to help schools present their pupil premium strategy statements.

You may wish to plan your pupil premium use over 3 years. You should aim to update the online strategy statement by the end of the autumn term each year to reflect your plans for the academic year after assessing the needs of your pupils, both new and existing.

For the current academic year, you must include:

  • your school’s pupil premium grant allocation amount
  • a summary of the main barriers to educational achievement faced by eligible pupils at the school
  • how you’ll spend the pupil premium to overcome those barriers and the reasons for that approach
  • how you’ll measure the effect of the pupil premium
  • the date of the next review of the school’s pupil premium strategy

For the previous academic year, you must include:

  • how you spent the pupil premium allocation
  • the effect of the expenditure on pupils

New Requirements:

All schools that receive pupil premium funding must publish a pupil premium strategy statement each year by 31 December.

In the strategy statement, you must explain how your pupil premium and recovery premium is being spent and the outcomes that are being achieved for pupils. It’s important that parents and governors understand this, and you should write it with them in mind.

You must use the DfE template to produce your statement. This can be found alongside completed examples and guidance for school leaders on the pupil premium guidance page.

The template has been designed to ensure that your statement reflects the requirements in the pupil premium conditions of grant. This includes a requirement for pupil premium and recovery premium to be spent in line with the department’s ‘menu of approaches’ from the start of the 2022 to 2023 academic year. The menu can be found in the document ‘Using pupil premium: guidance for school leaders’, on the pupil premium guidance page.

We recommend that you plan your pupil premium use over 3 years. If you do so, you are still required to update your statement each year to reflect your spending activity for that academic year and the impact of pupil premium in the previous academic year.

Year 7 literacy and numeracy catch-up premium

This funding stopped in 2020 so this section has been removed.

Previous Requirements:

If your school has received year 7 literacy and numeracy catch-up premium fundingfor the 2019 to 2020 academic year, you must publish:

  • details of how you spent your allocation for that year
  • how your use of that allocation made a difference to the attainment of the pupils who benefit from the funding

New Requirements:

None

Coronavirus (COVID-19) catch-up premium

Now that we are “living with COVID” this section has been removed.

Previous Requirements:

If your school gets the coronavirus (COVID-19) catch-up premium grant in academic year 2020 to 2021, you should publish details of:

  • how it is intended that the grant will be spent
  • how the effect of this expenditure on the educational attainment of those pupils at the school will be assessed

New Requirements:

None

Public sector equality duty

This has just been renamed from Equality Objectives and reordered but the information is exactly the same. 

Charging and Remissions policies

With the current cost of living crisis, a bullet point has been added to ensure you explain situations where you would make an exception where payment would normally be expected. 

Previous Requirements:

You must publish your school’s charging and remissions policies (this means when you cancel fees). The policies must include details of:

  • the activities or cases where your school will charge pupils’ parents

New Requirements:

You must publish your school’s charging and remissions policies (this means when you cancel fees). The policies must include details of:

  • the activities or cases where your school will charge pupils’ parents
  • the circumstances where your school will make an exception on a payment you would normally expect to receive under your charging policy

Templates

These are the templates that we complete as we audit school websites, which you can find out more about here.  We hope you find them useful! 

Share the Post:

Related Posts